TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute | Science and Engineering Conference on Sports Innovations (SECSI) – 2016
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Science and Engineering Conference on Sports Innovations (SECSI) – 2016

22 Jan Science and Engineering Conference on Sports Innovations (SECSI) – 2016

On Friday the 8th of April 2016, the TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute has teamed up with the Amsterdam Institute of Sports Science (AISS – link) organised the Science and Engineering Conference on Sports Innovations (SECSI). The aim of the conference was to bring together scientific research with respect to sport and sport innovation. The organising committee has been hard at work on creating a diverse programme, with 32 slots for oral presentations and a set of poster presentations, which have been held during a ‘walking lunch’. The event toke place in the Auditorium of the VU Amsterdam.

Check the Full programme

Check also
Video compilation by Kenniscentrum Sport [In Dutch]

Organisers

Prof. dr. Frans van der Helm, TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute

Prof. dr. Geert Savelsbergh,  Amsterdam Institute of Sport Science (AISS)


Facts
When: Friday 8th April 2016

Time: 9.00-18.00

Where: Auditorium and Agora room, Main building VU, Amsterdam

Conference language: English


Aim  

Bring together scientific research with respect to sport and sport innovation

Preliminary program

Keynote presentation of Professor dr. Steve Haake, Sheffield Hallam University, UK

Engineering sport: how do you know it works, where is it going and isn’t it just cheating?

Science, engineering and technology have been used for millennia to improve sporting performance.  While sports science seeks to improve the useful power output of the athlete, sports engineering aims to minimise or eradicate wasteful energy losses that slow us down.  Some technologies obviously work: starting blocks in running, dimpled golf balls, carbon fibre vaulting poles.  But there are others that are a little more tenuous. String savers for tennis rackets, matched golf shafts, power bands.  This keynote will look at some of the advances that engineering has brought to sport and ask the question, does it really work?  If it does, isn’t it just cheating?  And where should the technologists working in sport go next?

Presentations: 32 slots for Oral presentation (15min = 10m + 5m Q&A time)

Poster presentation during ‘walking’ lunch

Download the full programme here.


Conference secretariat

Secsi@tudelft.nl


Local organising committee

Stacey Angel (VU)

Dr. Daan Bregman (TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute)

Neal Damen (AISS)

Patricia van Rijn (VU)

Anoek van Vlaanderen, Msc (TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute)

 

Scientific committee
Prof. dr. M. van Bottenburg,  University of  Utrecht

Prof. dr. A.C. Brombacher, TU Eindhoven

Prof. dr. F.C.T. van der Helm, TU Delft

Prof. Dr. H.J. van den Herik, Leiden University & University of Tilburg

prof.dr.ir. H.F.J.M. Koopman, University of Twente

Prof. dr. K.A.P.M. Lemmink,  UMCG

Prof. dr.  l. van Loon, Maastricht University

Dr. A. Nieuwenhuys, Radboud University

Dr. J. Stubbe, HVA & Codarts

Prof. dr. G.J.P. Savelsbergh, VU, HVA

Dr. S.I.  de Vries,  HHS

Dr. N. van Veldhoven, NOC-NSF, Windsheim

Dr. E. Verhagen, VUMC

Prof. dr. S. Vos,  Fontys & TU Eindhoven