TU Delft Sports Engineering Institute | A 3D printed mannequin of Tom Dumoulin in the TU Delft wind tunnel helps gain a competitive advantage
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A 3D printed mannequin of Tom Dumoulin in the TU Delft wind tunnel helps gain a competitive advantage

11 Oct A 3D printed mannequin of Tom Dumoulin in the TU Delft wind tunnel helps gain a competitive advantage

During the big Tour de France time trial on 15 July, Tom Dumoulin wore a new skinsuit, jointly developed by Team Giant-Alpecin and the TU Delft. And… he won! The university applied an innovative method to research the aerodynamics of the suit: Dumoulin’s body was first scanned, after which a 3D mannequin of his body was printed. The drag of this mannequin – each time with a different suit – was then tested and optimised in the TU Delft’s wind tunnel.

 

Precise measurements

One of the areas where professional cyclists can still make a difference is (even) better aerodynamics. This is partly determined by the cyclist’s posture on the bike, but a more streamlined outfit can also play a part. Reason enough for Team Giant-Alpecin to collaborate with TU Delft scientists on developing an improved cycling suit. ‘It’s split seconds that count in cycling, especially during a time trial , so if a faster suit can deliver only a small improvement, this can still make the difference’, according to Tom Dumoulin. After all, the margin between Tom Dumoulin and the runner-up in the prologue of the Giro d’Italia was a mere twenty two thousandths of a second.

Read more and see pictures and movies of the mannequin and the wind tunnel test.

 

 

See also [Media coverage, in Dutch]